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Enforcement of Court Orders in Massachusetts

Salem, MA Child Support Enforcement Attorney

In order to enrich the lives of children, it is vital that parents fulfill their financial responsibilities and provide for their children. If paternity has been established, then fathers are expected to support their children whether born outside of wedlock or not. When a court orders a parent to pay child support, that order is not optional and it can be legally enforced by the courts. If the other parent has failed to pay their court ordered support, or is refusing to pay support, then a Salem divorce lawyer from my firm may be able to assist you.

At KRP Law, LLC, I can assist parents in establishing paternity, enforcing child support orders and modifying child support orders in cases where circumstances have changed. Parents have a legal obligation to support their children and they cannot simply cease making payments if they want more custody or visitation time or any other types of demands. It is vital that court ordered support payments are made regularly and on time. If parents fail to do so, then the court does have the right to intervene.

Massachusetts Child Support Enforcement

According to Massachusetts regulations, if a parent fails to make their court ordered support payments, they can turn to the Department of Revenue for assistance. They have a Child Support Enforcement Division which has the electric and automated resources necessary to secure the past due support payments. One of the most common methods of enforcement is through the electronic transfer of funds out of the parent's payroll. Monthly interest can accrue on any past due child support as a penalty.

The Department of Revenue has the authority to request that their employee withhold a certain amount of funds from their paycheck and then put into the appropriate child support account. This is also known as an income-withholding order. These types of order can be enforced in other states as well, in case the parent leaves the commonwealth and moves to another state to avoid paying support. Serious penalties can come from this, including a ten year prison sentence and/or a fine up to $10,000.

If the parent is no longer able to afford the monthly child support payments due to a change in circumstances, then they may be able to persuade the court to modify the order of support. However, if a parent willfully abandons their spouse and minor child and fails to make provisions for the child when they have the capabilities to do so, then they are considered to be in contempt of court. Anyone in this position could face imprisonment for up to five years, and/or a fine of $5,000. These enforcement methods are also used in alimony cases when the individuals fail to pay their court ordered spousal support.

Speak With a Salem, MA Divorce Lawyer

Searching for an attorney for a court order enforcement case in Salem? Enforcing court orders is not something that you should attempt on your own. Seek the help of an experienced divorce and family law attorney who is well-versed in the enforcement system. At KRP Law, LLC I provide clients with compassionate and responsive legal counsel that they can trust.

Contact KRP Law, LLC today for a free consultation to learn what I can do for you!


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